Friday, April 18, 2014

Research Q & A - Rum Runner Gets Busted

Here at the Chicago Genealogical Society we occasionally receive questions from our members and others reaching out to us. If you can help answer this question or have information to add, leave a comment below.

Here is a recent question received:


                                                                                                                   

Hi,
I recently found a newspaper article about a relative in August 1924 who was arrested in Illinois for rum running during Prohibition and (according to the article) states that “the prisoners were taken to Chicago Monday [Aug 11] afternoon”.  I would really like to find any arrest record and potential mug shot. Do you know if Chicago maintains an archive of such documents and who or what entity that would be?


Craig Pfannkuche, Corresponding Secretary of Chicago Genealogical Society replied:


In response to your question about where prohibition arrest data might be found in Chicago relating to your relatives, I would first need to know both who made the arrests and where the arrests were made.  If the arrest was federal, and it seems like it might have been since your relative was "brought to Chicago" for processing, then, if the arrest was enough of a "big deal," the record might be found in the northern district Federal court records. Those court records are archived at the Great Lakes Region - National Archives found on South Pulaski Avenue in Chicago.  If the "bust" was made in Cook County/Chicago, then the record would be in the Court Clerk Archives, Room 1113, Daley Building in downtown Chicago.


A note about court records.  Arrest records from that time no longer exist.  What does exist are only the court dockets (calendars for the trial) and final outcomes if, in fact, there actually was a trial (not very usual).  The only really complete records with "testimony" which still exist can be found in the Civil court records (Circuit and Superior).  Prohibition arrests were not civil actions so you would not be able to find data there.  Civil court case records (divorces, suits, etc.) are also indexed and archived at the Clerk of the Cook County Court Archive.


In sum, you need to know at what level (Federal or county/state) the arrests were made and just WHERE the arrests were made to be able to figure out where the records might be found.  You also need to know if there actually was a court appearance.  Many "arrests" in prohibition days were "arrests", confiscation, a trip to the station followed by a release with no trial action.  Your "best bet" for data is still the newspapers where the "bust" took place - unless it was in Chicago where most small level arrests were never reported and were hardly ever heard in a court.
Suburban Star, Morgan Park News, August 7, 1924.

In fact, I am told that violations of Volstead act were not violations of local law since the Volstead act was a Federal law.


The poster replied with this message:


Hi,
Thank you for your very informative response and clues where to look.  I attached the newspaper article from 1924 (see far right column story "Burr Oak Booze Joint...".  They were arrested in Burr Oak(?) and/or Morgan Park near Chicago, but the article states (as you pointed out) the case was turned over to the federal authorities since it was a violation of federal law, and then they were transported to Chicago.  This portion is detailed in the paragraph second from the bottom.  Due to the enormity of the operation, I would think it was a fairly big deal.  So, probably the first place to look is the National Archives on South Pulaski Ave in Chicago?  I take it that any records or mug shots would be open to the public, especially that it has been 90 years.

I will start there.

Again, thank you for your help and if you think of any other clues, I would be interested in them!  

                                                                                                                                 

Have research questions? Have a mystery photo? Send it along with what you know about it to info@chicagogenealogy.org, or post it to our CGS Facebook Page.  We may not be able to answer every question, but we may post your question on the blog or in our newsletter.

Monday, April 14, 2014

CGS Program: Speed Dating with Genealogists


The brick wall. Everyone has one in their family tree. Questions that only lead to more questions.


On Saturday, April 5th the Chicago Genealogical Society hosted four experts:
Jeanne Larzalere Bloom- Full-time professional researcher specializing in Chicago and Cook County research.
Craig Pfannkuche- Independent research professional and President of Memory Trail Research, Inc.
Julius Machnikowski- Clerk at the Circuit Court of Cook County Archives.
Matt Rutherford- Curator of Genealogy and Local History at the Newberry Library.



Everyone brought their toughest research questions to the Newberry Library. The room vibrated with the sharing of research tips and family history telling. The panel gave research tips, switching participants every 4 minutes. It was such fun! The expertise of the panel was astounding.


Every participant seemed to gain some tip about their research. It is always wonderful to gather together with those who have a passion for learning their genealogy.

Check out our video taken at the event! Thank you to all that participated.  Subscribe to our brand new YouTube channel!





Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Historical Military Records at the National Archives at Chicago

Learn about the historical military records at the National Archives in this upcoming workshop.

Historical Military Records

When: Saturday, April 12, 2014 – 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 
Where: National Archives at Chicago, 7358 S. Pulaski Road in Chicago

From the Revolutionary War to the recent past, the National Archives maintains service and pension
records for the men and women of the armed forces. Learn where these records are located, what
information is necessary to order the file, and how to place an order. This class will also address privacy and access.

To reserve your spot, send your name and contact information to Kris Maldre Jarosik, Education
Specialist, via e-mail at kristina.jarosik@nara.gov. Upon receipt we will confirm workshop registration with an e-mail.

National Archives at Chicago Public Programs Calender

Monday, March 31, 2014

CGS Program: Speed Dating for Genealogists

The Chicago Genealogical Society invites you to attend our first Saturday of the month program this Saturday, April 5th at 1:30 p.m. Our program will be Speed Dating for Genealogists.

Back by popular demand! Come and participate in an exciting and fun program. Bring your “brick wall” research questions and you will have an opportunity to ask an expert. You will only have a limited time for each question. SPEED is the key, so be clear and specific with your questions. Participate and also learn from other members as they get help on their “brick walls”. It will be an interactive and enjoyable program. Our Expert Panel:

Jeanne Larzalere Bloom CGSM
A full-time professional researcher specializing in Chicago and Cook County research

Julius Machnikowski
Clerk at the Circuit Court of Cook County Archives and specializes in Polish genealogy.

Craig Pfannkuche
Independent research professional and President of Memory Trail Research, Inc.

Matt Rutherford
Curator of Genealogy and Local History at the Newberry Library.

The program will be at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton, Chicago, and begin at 1:30 p.m. The program is free. The Newberry does not have a visitor parking lot. However there is metered parking and garage parking available in the neighborhood. The following garage offers discounted parking to Newberry patrons. Remember to bring your parking ticket with you so it can be validated by the Newberry security guard. 100 West Chestnut Street: Enter on Clark Street; $8 (0-6 hours) and $9 (6-8 hours).

Friday, March 14, 2014

Resource Review- Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter

Genealogical Resource Review --- Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter http://blog.eogn.com/

Eastman's is the most widely read daily genealogy newsletter in the world, offering news articles of importance to the North American genealogy community and also touching on global genealogy news.  Dick Eastman originally only emailed news in the 1990's until the Internet allowed for his current blog.  "The newsletter also expanded to two versions: a free version supported by advertising at http://www.eogn.com and a subscription-based Plus Edition at http://www.eogn.com/wp. The Plus Edition has more articles, focusing on the more in-depth topics. The Plus Edition also contains no advertising.  Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter has also expanded to offer more online services to the genealogy community, including an online genealogy encyclopedia (at http://www.eogen.com), and an online genealogy bookstore at http://www.RootsBooks.com. The bookstore sells thousands of genealogy and history-related books, CDs, and software."

Along with checking Eastman's for the latest genealogy community news, genealogists researching Chicago ancestors can benefit greatly by using the search box near the top of the EOGN blog called, "Search Past Newsletter Articles" . . . you can find articles on many Chicago genealogical topics (especially for ethnicities) and locations.

The Chicago Genealogical Society is a proud contributor to Eastman's "Calendar of Genealogy Events" at http://calendar.eogn.com/eogn-calendar:illinois (link also found in the right sidebar).

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Now Announcing: CGS FALL SEMINAR with Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist


The Chicago Genealogical Society is proud to announce a Fall 2014 Genealogy Seminar on Saturday, September 13, 2014, at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library, in Arlington Heights, IL. Our guest speaker will be Judy G. Russell, The Legal Genealogist. 

 
The day will start with the opening of registration at 9:30am and the first program starting at 10:00am. There will be four programs offered during the day:

>Don’t Forget the Ladies – A Genealogist’s Guide to Women and the Law
>ABCs of DNA
>Beyond X and Y: The Promise and Pitfalls of Autosomal DNA Testing 
>Staying out of Trouble – the Rights and Responsibilities of Today’s Genealogists

It will be a fun day of genealogy learning. 

For those of you who have heard Judy speak, we are sure you will be the first to register for this special genealogy day. For those who have not heard her speak, we suggest you visit her website and read her blog http://www.legalgenealogist.com/. Judy posts nearly every day an informative genealogy post which is usually sprinkled with her humor.

You can find more information about the genealogy seminar on the CGS website http://www.chicagogenealogy.org/. We are excited about Judy visiting the Chicago Genealogical Society. The seminar will be Judy’s first time speaking in the Chicago and Northern Illinois area. Let’s welcome her to the Windy City!

Monday, February 24, 2014

Join Us, March 1! Free Program: Holy Cow! Where Are My Chicago Catholics Now?



Join Us this Saturday!

The Chicago Genealogical Society invites you to attend our first Saturday of the month program this Saturday, March 1st. Our program will be Holy Cow! Where Are My Chicago Catholics Now. Teresa Steinkamp-McMillin CGSM will be our speaker. The first Chicago Catholic church opened in 1833 and by 1900 there were about 140 Catholic churches in the city. Finding your Catholic ancestor's church records (baptism, confirmation, marriage and funeral) can be a daunting task without a few key pieces of information. This lecture will explain how to find the data necessary to tap into these valuable resources. Once potential churches are identified, the process of finding the records for that church and timeframe will be explained.

Teresa Steinkamp McMillin is a Board-certified GenealogistSM. In addition to core experience in genealogical research, she specializes in German genealogy (ancestors who lived in any area of the United States or Europe, but with German origins). She also specializes in helping people with Cook County genealogy including Chicago and other areas of the Midwest. She has helped many people find answers to their questions about their heritage. Her website is http://www.lindstreet.com/

The program will be at the Newberry Library, 60 West Walton, Chicago, and begin at 1:30 p.m. The program is free. The Newberry does not have a visitor parking lot. However there is metered parking and garage parking available in the neighborhood. The following garage offers discounted parking to Newberry patrons. Remember to bring your parking ticket with you so it can be validated by the Newberry security guard. 100 West Chestnut Street: Enter on Clark Street; $8 (0-6 hours) and $9 (6-8 hours).